GERD Awareness Week
By GI Associates
November 12, 2018
Category: blog
Tags: GERD  

 

 

 

What it's like to live with GERD and what you can do

For some, it’s impossible to not be aware of GERD, a condition in which stomach acids travel back up into the esophagus, causing pain, irritation, and damage.

This year, GERD Awareness Week is November 18th - 25th. You can learn more about activities and events you can be a part of by visiting this website.

What is GERD?

Every time you swallow food, your stomach produces acid to aid in digestion. In a healthy gastrointestinal system, a valve opens to allow food and liquid to pass from the esophagus to your stomach. In those with GERD, the valve may not close fully or may open too often. While everyone will probably experience heartburn at some point during their lifetime, if you have GERD you will likely deal with it persistently. Everybody is different when it comes to symptoms, but common ones include:

  • Regurgitation
  • Heartburn
  • Nausea
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • Problems swallowing
  • Belching
  • Hoarseness
  • A sour or bitter taste in the mouth

GERD and the holidays

With the holidays approaching, minds have no doubt turned to food and all the feasting that takes place during this most wonderful time of the year. Unfortunately, 60% of Americans experience GERD at least once a year—and the most common time of year GERD develops is (you guessed it) the holidays. 

The following is a list of foods you may want to avoid if you are prone to GERD: 

  • Fatty foods
  • Spicy foods
  • Acidic foods, like tomatoes and citrus
  • Alcohol 
  • Mint
  • Chocolate
  • Onions
  • Coffee or any caffeinated beverage
  • Carbonated beverages

Basic lifestyle changes can help to manage or even avoid GERD altogether. Exercising regularly, quitting smoking, and losing excess weight are always a good idea. 

Timing and quantity of meals makes a difference too.  Try eating five or six little meals instead of three huge ones. Avoid eating 2-3 hours before going to bed or lying down. Keep upright and let your digestive system do its thing—and skip the post-feast nap. Your stomach and esophagus will thank you.

Unfortunately for some, GERD symptoms persist past the holidays despite medication and lifestyle changes. If this applies to you, surgical options may be considered.  Ask your gastroenterologist about the best plan for you.

If you have suffered from reflux over an extended period of time, endoscopic evaluation of the lining of your esophagus may be recommended to evaluate for Barrett’s Esophagus, a precancerous condition which can develop into esophageal cancer. Careful monitoring and periodic evaluation help with early detection and prevention of this form of cancer. 

If you think you may have GERD, don’t hesitate to contact us. We can help you get ahead of this problem so you can focus on the enjoyment of the holidays, not the pain of GERD. Schedule an appointment with a gastroenterologist at GI Associates by calling 877-442-7762 or using our online form.

Comments: